Category: "RBC church life"

Why did Jesus curse the fig tree? (sermon follow-up from Sunday 26th March 2017)

by Gavin  

Why did Jesus curse the fig tree? (sermon follow-up from Sunday 26th March 2017)

 

Why did Jesus curse the fig tree when it had no figs, and yet Mark clearly made the point in Mark 11:13 that it was not the season for figs?

 

A few folk picked up on that yesterday after the service – well done!  Good Bereans, following the text!!!! OK, I alluded to the solution in the way I unpacked the passage, but didn’t want to get lost in the technical details.  The answer is not hard, and lies in a careful lexical and contextual understanding.

 

In essence, as I explained, fig trees are unique in that the fruit appears before the leaves.  Early buds comes BEFORE the leaves appear.  Therefore, tree with leaves should have fruit!  So how then do we read Mark’s enigmatic comment?  Remember that, firstly, Mark often inserts explanatory notes, so this comment is quite possibly for the benefit of those who were not familiar with fig botany!  Secondly, different Greek words were used to describe the young buds and the mature fruit.  So the sense is that is was the season for young buds, even if the full, ripe figs had not developed.  The point remains: this tree was deceptive because it was in full leaf, but had no fruit – it remains a picture of the empty worship of Israel at the time!

 

For those wanting the technical stuff, Edwards’ commentary excerpt here might be of value:

 

The sandwich complex begins on the road from Bethany, which John 11:18 identifies as “fifteen stadia” (slightly less than two miles) from Jerusalem. Jesus is hungry, and seeing from a distance a fig tree in leaf he approaches it in hopes of finding something to eat. In disappointment at finding no figs, and in earshot of the disciples, he condemns the tree.

 After the fig harvest from mid-August to mid-October, the branches of fig trees sprout buds that remain undeveloped throughout the winter. These buds swell into small green knops known in Hebrew as paggim in March–April, followed shortly by the sprouting of leaf buds on the same branches, usually in April. The fig tree thus produces fig knops before it produces leaves. Once a fig tree is in leaf one therefore expects to find branches loaded with paggim in various stages of maturation. This is implied in 11:13, where Jesus, seeing a fig tree in full foliage, turns aside in hopes of finding something edible. In the spring of the year the paggim are of course not yet ripened into mature summer figs, but they can be eaten, and often are by natives (Hos 9:10; Cant 2:13). The tree in v. 13, however, turns out to be deceptive, for it is green in foliage, but when Jesus inspects it he finds no paggim; it is a tree with the signs of fruit but with no fruit.

 The most puzzling part of the brief narrative of the cursing of the fig tree is the end of 11:13, “because it was not the season of figs.” This phrase is usually understood to exonerate the tree for not producing fruit since it was not yet the season. Understood as such, the phrase makes Jesus’ curse vindictive and irrational, as Bertrand Russell deduced. But this is neither the only nor the best way to understand the phrase. It is better simply to distinguish between mature figs (Gk. sykē; Heb. te’enim) and early or unripe figs (Heb. paggim). The end of v. 13 might be paraphrased, “It was, of course, not the season for figs, but it was for paggim.”  [Edwards, J.R., 2002. The Gospel according to Mark, Grand Rapids, MI; Leicester, England: Eerdmans; Apollos.]

WHERE TO NEXT??? How do I pray for my spiritually blind children?

by Gavin  

WHERE TO NEXT??? How do I pray for my spiritually blind children?

This blog idea came to me yesterday afternoon, flowing from a very high-speed discussion with someone after our 9am worship service yesterday.  I has unpacked Mark 10:46-52, and considered the sight that was restored to Bartimaeus – both physically and spiritually.  I tried to make appropriate application – to both the believer and the unbeliever… themes of worship, blindness, grace, mercy, faith, commitment and obedience and submission!  It was there in general terms.

 

Then a great question came from a concerned parent: “How do I pray for my unsaved children in light of that, because they still spiritually blind?  In fact, how do we pray for our church kids and teens as many are spiritually blind?”

                                                  

I was in between a service and another class that I needed to teach.  Great question.  Left field.  Heart of concern from a parent.   Hmmmmmm…  Well, I threw out a few things in about 13 ½ seconds, but didn’t get a chance to give much more.  The realisation dawned that, as preachers, we can’t always poke and prod into every possible area of application, but that questions do get raised.

 

So then, what I thought I might start doing, is a follow-up blog from time to time, picking up on some of those loose ends, and trying to drive application a bit more.

 

This comes as a first “trial” attempt!

 

How then do we pray for our own children, and church children, who are spiritually blind to the truth, hard to God and seemingly resistant to the gospel?

 

Here are some general pointers, but not exhaustive, to use in intercessory prayer for our children:

 

  • Realise that they have sinful hearts, and pray that they would come to know their own need before God. Pray that there self-delusion is confronted.  Pray that those who think they’re saved by virtue of coming to church and acting “Christian” would be convicted of sin.

 

The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately sick; who can understand it?” (Jeremiah 17:9, ESV)

 

  • Pray for divine heart surgery to occur, and God’s Spirit to come and bring life whwere there is death.

 

And I will give you a new heart, and a new spirit I will put within you. And I will remove the heart of stone from your flesh and give you a heart of flesh. And I will put my Spirit within you, and cause you to walk in my statutes and be careful to obey my rules.” (Ezekiel 36:26–27, ESV)

 

  • Pray for the re-birth to happen, for regeneration of heart, which is God’s work alone!

 

Jesus answered, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God.” (John 3:5, ESV)

 

  • Pray that true Spirit-achieved faith happens in a life of a child or a teen. Pray that you yourself do not resort to clever arguments to win a point, but fail to argue a child into the Kingdom.

 

And I, when I came to you, brothers, did not come proclaiming to you the testimony of God with lofty speech or wisdom. For I decided to know nothing among you except Jesus Christ and him crucified. And I was with you in weakness and in fear and much trembling, and my speech and my message were not in plausible words of wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power,” (1 Corinthians 2:1–4, ESV)

 

  • Pray that Satan’s veil would be removed that blinds to the truth, and that the Holy Spirit would indeed cause light to shine in the darkness.

 

And even if our gospel is veiled, it is veiled to those who are perishing. In their case the god of this world has blinded the minds of the unbelievers, to keep them from seeing the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God. For what we proclaim is not ourselves, but Jesus Christ as Lord, with ourselves as your servants for Jesus’ sake. For God, who said, “Let light shine out of darkness,” has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.” (2 Corinthians 4:3–6, ESV)

 

  • Pray your increased opportunities for spiritually shaped discussion with your own children, teens and student, and more for that within church life.

 

At the same time, pray also for us, that God may open to us a door for the word, to declare the mystery of Christ…” (Colossians 4:3, ESV)

 

  • Pray for great patience and godly parenting within our own homes, to keep exposing kids to the truth, and to keep shepherding them in ways consistent with the gospel.

 

Fathers, do not provoke your children to anger, but bring them up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord.” (Ephesians 6:4, ESV)

 

  • Keep praying!!!! Be persistent in prayer.  Right back in the 3rd century a young man called Augustine went off the rails, and his mother – Monica – kept praying for him.  Years later, in a dramatic conversion in Italy, Augustine came to faith, and became one of the greatest writers and theologians of the early church.

 

And he told them a parable to the effect that they ought always to pray and not lose heart.” (Luke 18:1, ESV)

 

Let’s appeal by faith to God’s mercy and grace for the necessary interventions in the lives of our children and teens – at home and at church!

I have wanted to leave the church many times!

by Gavin  

I have wanted to leave the church many times!

[This blog is quoted directly and fully from the final chapter of Mark Dever’s book “What Is a Healthy Church?” published by Crossway Books]

 

I have wanted to leave this church many times … all the talk about battling sin and serving others; people keeping me accountable—people who are sinful themselves.” An elder in my church recently said all this.

 

He continued, “But I realize this is exactly the point because I’m still sinful, and I want to be done with sin. I need the accountability, the modeling, the care, the love, the attention. My flesh hates it all! But apart from all this, I probably would have divorced my wife, and then a second, and then a third, and never lived with my children. God shows his grace and care for me through his church.”

 

Healthy churches, churches that increasingly reflect the character of God as it’s been revealed in his Word, are not always the easiest places to be. The sermons might be long. The expectations might be high. The talk of sin will probably feel overdone to many. The fellowship might even feel, at least sometimes, intrusive. But the key is that word increasingly. If we increasingly reflect God’s character, then it stands to reason that aspects of our lives, individually and corporately, don’t reflect his character—there must be smudges on the mirror that need to be polished out, curves in the glass that need to be flattened. That takes work.

 

And God in his goodness has called us to live out the Christian life together, as our mutual love and care reflect the love and care of God. Relationships imply commitment in the world. Surely they imply no less in the church. He never meant our growth to occur alone on an island but with and through one another.

 

Does a healthy church, then, know joy? Oh, it knows joy, indeed! It knows the joy of real change. It knows the joy of broken shackles. It knows the joy of meaningful fellowship and true unity, not unity for its own sake, but unity around a common salvation and worship. It knows the joy of Christ-like love given and received. Most wonderfully, it knows the joy of “reflecting the Lord’s glory” and “being transformed into his likeness with ever-increasing glory” (2 Cor. 3:18).

 

In the third commandment (Exod. 20:7; Deut. 5:11), God warned his people not to take his name in vain. He didn’t mean to simply prohibit profane language. He also meant to warn us against taking his name upon ourselves in vain, such that our lives speak falsely about him. This command is for us as the church.

 

Many churches today are sick. We mistake selfish gain for spiritual growth. We mistake mere emotion for true worship. We treasure worldly acceptance rather than divine approval, an approval which is generally given to a life that is incurring worldly opposition. Regardless of their statistical profiles, too many churches today seem unconcerned about the very biblical marks that should distinguish a vital, growing church.

 

The health of the church should concern all Christians, particularly those who are called to be leaders in the church. Our churches are to display God and his glorious gospel to his creation. We are to bring him glory by our lives together. This burden of display is our awesome responsibility and tremendous privilege.

 

So let’s go back to where we started. What are you looking for in a church? Are you looking for one that reflects the values of you and your community or one that reflects the out-of-this-world and glorious character of God? Of these two options, which will better present a light on the hill for a world lost in darkness?

 

 

Dever, M., 2007. What Is a Healthy Church?, Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books.

#feesmustfall 2016 - prayer thoughts for our church

by Gavin  

#feesmustfall 2016 - prayer thoughts for our church

 

We awoke yet again to news of a student protest in Parktown this morning, after a weekend of reports of continued unrest across various campuses in South Africa.  How should Christians respond?  One temptation, I suppose, is to grumble and complain and air opinions.  However, there is a depth and complexity to this whole movement which I fear many of us fail to grasp and understand, and therefore our opinions probably don’t really reflect much true consideration of the deep rooted anger, economics disparity and suspicion that simmers under the surface in our country.

 

This short piece is by no means an attempt to delve into the intricacies of the issues.  In fact, this should be read in conjunction with my previous musings from a year ago (see previous blog).  This is therefore more to urge prayer from our church people as we live and function in this community which is so affected by these protests.  Our church families have students who are in this university cauldron, and their own lives and studies have been affected. There are also families in our church who would really benefit from a #feesmustfall outcome in that they do not have the financial means to afford tertiary education.  Our supported gospel ministry on Wits campus has also been disrupted by the protest action.

 

I know that we as a local church have prayed for this matter – it has featured as prayer items in our Fellowship Groups, men’s “Okes” group and even in corporate intercessory prayer in services.  It is right that we do so…

 

First of all, then, I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for all people, for kings and all who are in high positions, that we may lead a peaceful and quiet life, godly and dignified in every way. This is good, and it is pleasing in the sight of God our Savior,” (1 Timothy 2:1–3, ESV)

 

We’re called to pray for our country and government.  Let’s include in that Minister Nzimande, the Department of High Education and other stake holders.  Pray for the various Senates and Vice-Chancellors.  Pray for the student leaders and students involved – for calm, safety and reason.  The way ahead is going to be fraught with many dangers and challenges.   But, for the sake of all in our country, pray!

 

But let’s also pray being mindful of the human sinfulness involved.  Sure, the initial protests have opened up (maybe rightfully) a can of worms, and exposed issues in society that have been forgotten.  But through the potential legitimacy of the original #feesmustfall action, there has been a slide to what the Bible accurately attributes to human depravity… consider the actions and attitudes of the radical protesters, the rampant violence, the arson, the anti-authoritarian resistance etc against the backdrop of Scripture:

 

And since they did not see fit to acknowledge God, God gave them up to a debased mind to do what ought not to be done. They were filled with all manner of unrighteousness, evil, covetousness, malice. They are full of envy, murder, strife, deceit, maliciousness. They are gossips, slanderers, haters of God, insolent, haughty, boastful, inventors of evil, disobedient to parents, foolish, faithless, heartless, ruthless.” (Romans 1:28–31, ESV)

 

Is that description of human depravity not reflected in what is happening, in and through the actions of certain students and student leaders?  To be sure, much of what is occurring goes far beyond the original peaceable call for the fee issue to be addressed, but the hot-headedness of the 2016 protests is in stark contrast with the relative calm of 2015. 

 

In fact, the apostle Paul describes this scene in the context of the last days…

 

But understand this, that in the last days there will come times of difficulty. For people will be lovers of self, lovers of money, proud, arrogant, abusive, disobedient to their parents, ungrateful, unholy, heartless, unappeasable, slanderous, without self-control, brutal, not loving good, treacherous, reckless, swollen with conceit, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God, having the appearance of godliness, but denying its power. Avoid such people.” (2 Timothy 3:1–5, ESV)

 

Are we not seeing just a taste of that through the student unrest?

 

So then, should not a fair chunk of prayer be for the penetration of the gospel into this mess?  Surely we would be better serving the cause of God by praying “Your Kingdom come” when we gather and pray, as opposed to merely rehashing our opinions, “insights” and grumblings?  Pray that those who act like this because they do not know Christ, would indeed, by a divine and gracious intervention of God, come to a saving faith in the Lord Jesus.  Pray that some dramatic “But God” style intervention occurs, as per what Paul describes…

 

For we ourselves were once foolish, disobedient, led astray, slaves to various passions and pleasures, passing our days in malice and envy, hated by others and hating one another. But when the goodness and loving kindness of God our Savior appeared, he saved us…” (Titus 3:3–5, ESV)

 

And in fact, going back to the preceding verses, how should we pray for our Christian students on our campuses?  We at Randburg Baptist Church have students at Wits, UJ, Tuks and North West (Mahikeng)?  How should we pray for them?  Here are some pointers…

 

Remind them to be submissive to rulers and authorities, to be obedient, to be ready for every good work, to speak evil of no one, to avoid quarreling, to be gentle, and to show perfect courtesy toward all people.” (Titus 3:1–2, ESV)

 

and to aspire to live quietly, and to mind your own affairs, and to work with your hands, as we instructed you, so that you may walk properly before outsiders and be dependent on no one.” (1 Thessalonians 4:11–12, ESV)

 

In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven.” (Matthew 5:16, ESV)

 

But let none of you suffer as a murderer or a thief or an evildoer or as a meddler. Yet if anyone suffers as a Christian, let him not be ashamed, but let him glorify God in that name.” (1 Peter 4:15–16, ESV)

 

So flee youthful passions and pursue righteousness, faith, love, and peace, along with those who call on the Lord from a pure heart.” (2 Timothy 2:22, ESV)

 

So, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God.” (1 Corinthians 10:31, ESV)

 

So then, can I appeal to our Randburg Baptist Church for renewed prayer in this regard – for all concerned and involved in whatever way?  Let’s appeal to our God for His sovereign intervention – undeserving as we are as a nation for anything good from Him – to work, act, restrain, convict, save, lead, guide, assist and grant wisdom in this #feesmustfall scenario that is playing out across our land.

Praying for the men in your pulpit

by Gavin  

Praying for the men in your pulpit

The preacher's 5 year-old daughter noticed that her father always paused and bowed his head for a moment before starting his sermon. One day she asked him why.

 

"Well, Honey," he began, proud that his daughter was so observant of his messages, "I'm asking the Lord to help me preach a good sermon."

 

"How come He doesn't do it?" she asked.

 

OK, so stop laughing now….!!!! J  That was NOT my daughter, and even so, she would NEVER had said something like that… I hope!

 

There are many passages in Scripture that could (and should!) be used to shape our praying for those who, in God’s goodness to us, are charged with the exposition of His Word to us week by week.  We lack no depth of content as to what we could be praying for our preachers – at Randburg Baptist Church and elsewhere.

 

But as I was busy with my own reading plan earlier this morning, I came across Ezekiel 2… I know, these are words given to Ezekiel, and not to me. The context is different.  He was in exile.  Israel was still rebellious in outlook and action against God.  But – there is a consistent challenge to faithfulness in prophetic ministry that I think ripples through the centuries, is there not?

 

1 And he said to me, “Son of man, stand on your feet, and I will speak with you.” 2 And as he spoke to me, the Spirit entered into me and set me on my feet, and I heard him speaking to me. 3 And he said to me, “Son of man, I send you to the people of Israel, to nations of rebels, who have rebelled against me. They and their fathers have transgressed against me to this very day. 4 The descendants also are impudent and stubborn: I send you to them, and you shall say to them, ‘Thus says the Lord God.’ 5 And whether they hear or refuse to hear (for they are a rebellious house) they will know that a prophet has been among them. 6 And you, son of man, be not afraid of them, nor be afraid of their words, though briers and thorns are with you and you sit on scorpions. Be not afraid of their words, nor be dismayed at their looks, for they are a rebellious house. 7 And you shall speak my words to them, whether they hear or refuse to hear, for they are a rebellious house. 8 “But you, son of man, hear what I say to you. Be not rebellious like that rebellious house; open your mouth and eat what I give you.” 9 And when I looked, behold, a hand was stretched out to me, and behold, a scroll of a book was in it. 10 And he spread it before me. And it had writing on the front and on the back, and there were written on it words of lamentation and mourning and woe.

 

Randburg Baptist Church family, will you not commit to pray for the men who occupy our pulpits, at 9am and 12pm services, at our Diepsloot church plant, and also in the various teaching modules and Fellowship Groups, men’s and women’s meetings? 

  • Pray for diligent study, wise application, excellent delivery – but above all, a commitment to have God’s Word heralded, irrespective of whether it is liked, disliked, appreciated, resisted or heeded. 
  • Pray for the ministry of the Spirit to convict lost sinners, to warn professing believers who don’t truly follow Christ, to edify the saints and to bring life change to all of us.

 

Pray by name for our preachers:

  •  Gavin Johnston
  • Khulekani Mzilankatha
  • Gideon Mpeni
  • Bafana Tshabalala
  • Elias Masango
  • Lulamile Galoshe
  • Enoch Mpiko

 

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